From £27,5906

The design of the Grand Voyager is about as traditional as it gets. Gone are the modest curves and swoops of the previous-generation model, replaced by some of the most stolid lines in the sector.

Chrysler says that the design is clean and tailored, and that the lines share some cues with the 300C. Certainly, there’s something in that. The blockiness and proportions of body to glass are similar. If nothing else, the straightforward shape should make placing a Grand Voyager on the road quite easy for a 5143mm-long, 1953mm-wide car.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
I rather like the new Grand Voyager’s slabby, purposeful styling

Compared with the previous model, the roofline has been pulled out to create more interior room, and the sills have been extended to increase the appearance of solidity.

It isn’t particularly interesting, but it’s inoffensive enough. There’s one other traditional-MPV point of note, too, and it’s a welcome one: the rear side doors slide (many rivals’ do not), so they’re easier to open in tight spaces. Those with young families will know what a boon this is.

Underneath, the big Chrysler’s mechanicals are as traditional as its exterior. There are MacPherson struts suspending the front, with a compact and inexpensive torsion beam set-up at the rear.

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

And although this Grand Voyager is very much a new model, don’t think that it’s entirely new under the skin. The engines have been carried over from the previous generation with a few modifications, and some chassis and structural elements are the same, too, including the floorpan.

Save money on your car insurance

Compare quotesCompare insurance quotes

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week