‘One Ford’ may apply to the model, but it certainly doesn’t apply to the Mondeo’s power line-up. As befits a car that will be sold everywhere, the new Mondeo has a massively broad engine range.

The smallest petrol is the 1.0-litre EcoBoost, before the range moves through to 1.5 and 2.0-litre EcoBoost units in various states of tune. There’s also a 2.0-litre petrol-electric hybrid, which is only available as a four-door saloon.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
Chrome roof rails are standard on all Mondeo estates. The panoramic glass sunroof is a pricey £900 option, even on a Titanium

Diesels run from 1.5 litres through to the 2.0-litre engine of our test car. The 2.0 TDCi can be had with up to 207bhp, but the meat of the range will be in 148bhp or 178bhp form. These latter two models are all available with Ford's Intelligent All Wheel Drive system, which sends power to the rear when it detects a loss of traction at the front wheels, but predominantly defualts to front-wheel drive mode in normal driving conditions. Our 148bhp test car was mated to a six-speed manual gearbox. 

The Mondeo’s platform is Ford’s latest ‘CD’ architecture. In previous generations it has underpinned not only the Mondeo but also Land Rover’s Freelander and Volvo’s models. The breaking up of Ford’s Premier Automotive Group means it won’t any more, but it will still sit beneath Ford’s S-Max and Galaxy.

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As is the way with new platforms, the latest architecture is stiffer and lighter than before. Ford says up to 25kg has come out of the Mondeo, when you compare a 1.5 petrol model with its 1.6-litre predecessor. At 1599kg, our diesel estate was hardly a lightweight, but then this is the heaviest engine in the heaviest body style. Many rivals weigh plenty more.

The architecture uses MacPherson struts at the front, multi-link rear suspension and electric power steering. We’ll call the body itself a steel monocoque but, as is becoming common, there’s a bit more to it than that.

The A and B-pillars and roof rails are of hydro-formed high-strength steel, while there’s a magnesium bootlid inner on saloon and hatch models. In all, 61 percent of the steel used is classed by Ford as ‘high-strength’, and the body itself is up to 115kg lighter than before.

That said a typical overall weight saving is only 25kg, Ford tells us that 90kg has gone back into improving safety, comfort and convenience.

There’s plenty of it, too, up to and including massage seats. More relevant are the standard inclusions of technology such as lane-keeping assist, automatic parking assist and automatic braking with pedestrian detection. Our test car has all of those, some as optional extras.

 

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