This latest Honda Accord may be all new, but the philosophy behind it is anything but. Its design is determinedly evolutionary, a fact that is testament to the clarity of the vision for the outgoing generation of Accord.

Whether it has been successful in this regard is down to personal choice. But for what it’s worth, while we admire the fact that the Accord looks more grown up and expensive, we also lament slightly and subjectively that a lot of the cleanness of the original has been lost.

Matt Saunders Autocar

Matt Saunders

Road test editor
Thin A-pillars make for excellent forward visibility

In 2011, the Accord range was given new headlights, a new ‘sportier’ grille, reprofiled cooling ducts and foglights and a new bumper at the front, while the rear also received a new bumper, a new finish for the lights and chrome trim above the number plate for saloon models. New 17-inch alloy wheels were offered on ES and ES-GT models, while three new colours – Alabaster Silver, Graphite Lustre metallic and Celestrial Blue Pearl – were added to the options list.

As before, the Accord comes in two shapes – this saloon and an estate (still called Tourer) – but no longer will they sit on two different wheelbases. Although this means that the Tourer no longer looks like a flying coffin, you can also expect its carrying capacity to be somewhat abbreviated.

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Under the skin, the Accord could not hope for a more pukka specification, with double wishbone front suspension and a multi-link rear end ensuring a vice-like control over both axles.

It goes almost without saying that all the electronic primary safety systems you might expect on a car such as this are included. 

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