The first thing that draws your eye as you sit in an Infiniti M is its broad centre console, which bisects the dash and carries on between the seats to create two distinct zones for driver and passenger. This impression is further enhanced by trim that curves across the dash and down the doors, adding contrast and interest to what is already quite a busy interior.

That’s not to say that it is an unsuccessful interior. There are few elements of the Infiniti’s cabin that don’t exude quality, though whether they’re quite up to the standard of a car at this price is debatable.

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Road test editor
For all its shortfalls in practicality and ergonomics, the Infiniti still makes a convincing case for itself

Ergonomically it’s relatively average. The driver’s seat offers good levels of support and (electric) adjustment, which may be needed here more than in many big execs because forward and rearward visibility is poor by class standards. In the rear there’s an acceptable amount of room for two adults, but it’s far from being the most spacious.

Luggage space is also a problem for the M-series, in that the boot has a capacity of just 450 litres in the conventionally engined cars, and less again in the hybrid. That’s noticeably less than the 520 and 540 litres of space that you get in the BMW 5 Series and Merc E-Class.

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For all its shortfalls in practicality and ergonomics, the Infiniti still makes a convincing case for itself. It’s clear that this is not a car you buy for its practicality so much as for the way it makes you feel when you’re in it, and it does a good job of appearing reassuringly premium while avoiding the understated nature of many in this class.

Every model comes with an impressive amount of equipment too, further bolstering the Infiniti's premium feel. Kit includes tyre pressure monitoring, automatic lights and wipers, cruise control, heated electric folding mirrors, adaptive Bi-Xenon lights, Bluetooth connectivity, keyless entry and start, dual-zone climate, an electric sunroof, a heated steering wheel and electric front seats.

Though tyre noise is a noticeable background hum, it is generally a hushed, cosseting and well-finished cabin that could well be a deal-maker for many buyers.

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