At £16,600 for a petrol-powered Expression+ model, the Mégane starts at a broadly comparable point to its mainstream rivals from Ford and Vauxhall.

The entry-level trim is not poorly equipped (Renault’s focus on safety systems means adaptive cruise, active emergency braking and lane departure warning have been applied across the range), but because it fails to include a proper infotainment display, most buyers will opt for at least Dynamique Nav.

Nic Cackett

Nic Cackett

Road tester
Not an optimistic forecast for the Mégane by the experts at CAP, but the equivalent Seat Leon fares even worse

Alongside automatic headlights and wipers, dual-zone climate control and a 3D sound system, this adds the 7.0in version of the R-Link system, including sat-nav, for a £1500 step up.

Our test car, the S, is an additional £1000, for which you get 17in alloys, front and rear parking sensors plus a rear camera and, enticingly, the 8.7in portrait touchscreen that differentiates the Mégane from the competition. It is also our pick too.

If you are keen on the sportier-looking GT Line models, we think it is worth the reasonable premium.

Broadly speaking, at £20,400 for the dCi 110, the car is on a par with the Astra, Focus and Seat Leon, as you might expect in such a closely contested segment.

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Running costs should be broadly comparable, too, although the Mégane’s fuel economy isn’t quite on a par with that of its most efficient rivals.

The 47.2mpg average returned by the 1.5 dCi Mégane in True MPG testing is well shy of the Vauxhall Astra 1.6 CDTi 110 Ecoflex’s 56.3mpg result under the same conditions.

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