The Seat Alhambra has little of the deftness or enthusiasm that some might now want from an MPV. But it is no worse off for focusing on being a soothing drive rather than a stimulating one.

As enthusiasts, we’re sorry to note the absence of any real sparkle, and we know it can be done without compromise to ride comfort, but those buyers wanting something ultimately safe, stable and predictable will find nothing more suitable than this. 

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Road test editor
The brakes resist fade well and offer good feel through the pedal

The electrically assisted steering has a satisfying weight to it that provides quick responses off the dead-ahead position at speed and just the right level of assistance for parking manoeuvres. Inevitably, the body will roll on turn-in, but there is none of the disconcerting wobble present in some high-roofed cars, and even under very hard driving it never feels anything less than composed – even if it also never feels encouraging. 

Our test car rode on 17in alloy wheels (standard on the SE Lux) and there was an impressive blend of bump absorption and body control. Part of the success comes from the effective suppression of suspension noise, but the real benefit is in the pliancy of the dampers.

They absorb high-frequency disturbances without much fidgeting, even if there are cornering forces involved as well, and big-bump absorption is very good, with damper rebound impressively controlled. 

Top 5 Seven-seater MPVs

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

It can suffer from some jarring over bigger intrusions but certainly nothing that approaches the uncomfortable. As a whole, the ride quality is difficult to criticise beyond the most minor of faults.

Save money on your car insurance

Compare quotesCompare insurance quotes

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week